jump to navigation

What does learning look like . . . more thoughts March 21, 2010

Posted by IaninSheffield in research, TELIC.
Tags: , , , , ,
trackback

I’d like to thank Ed for starting a wonderful exchange on Twitter last night (night for me that is) by asking ‘what does learning look like?’ You’ll spot from my previous post that I’m chasing answers to the same question. It has to be said, there was a dearth of responses, but thanks to Dughall and David for adding to the debate and forcing me to address epistemological issues a little more carefully.
[Wonder why so few people responded? Maybe it’s because it’s such a tough question . . . and certainly not one which 140 characters allows sufficient response perhaps.]

Communicating

From ob1left on Flickr

David suggested that learning is empowered, enriched, entertained, enlightened. I can see where that’s coming from, but for me those adjectives are more to do with describing how pupils might feel after a good learning experience . . . but maybe using after-effects or consequences might be one way in which pupils describe their learning. In another alliterative response, Dughall saw learning as arising from collaborating, communicating and connecting; a social constructivist viewpoint and one I find attractive – well I would, given what prompted this post! But I also lean (at least by a few degrees) towards cognitivism and that learning is about making meaning from information and situations. Communication with others can be trivial and meaningless unless our thought processes are stimulated and challenged and we try to make sense of what’s being communicated and what we’re communicating.

So how exactly do we capture these things? Given the nature of our data collection tool – the digital camera – I suppose we’re going to need to be looking to capture activities with which learning is associated – collaboration, discussion, reflection, negotiation, investigation. Once again though, I have to remind my self that all of this is what I think. Much as I might regret it and despite appearances to the contrary, I’m no longer a teenager and definitely see the world through older eyes which need optical augmentation (yes, I mean specs!). I just can’t wait to see what learning looks like through our students’ much younger eyes.

Advertisements

Comments»

1. whatedsaid - March 31, 2010

Hi Ian
Thought provoking post as usual. I haven’t had time to pull together the thoughts I gathered on what learning looks like yet, as I was away at a conference, as you saw from other posts. But you have expressed the ideas so well.. much more intelligently and articulately than I could!! Will get to it soon though. Looking forward to seeing how your students’ photographic exploration goes..
Ed

2. What does learning look like? (trailer) « What Ed Said - April 2, 2010

[…]  I’ve seen wonderful examples of what learning looks like on teacher and student blogs.  Ian in Sheffield is planning to give cameras to students  for them to photograph what they think learning looks […]

3. Pam Thompson - April 3, 2010

You’re right Ian, it is a difficult one to put into words. I’m not sure I have the answer, but in my classroom I feel that learning’s happening when I see kids working together, explaining to each other, smiling when they get it (that aha moment 🙂 ). Nobody could ever describe my class as quiet, but I’ve become more relaxed about that, because I don’t think a silent classroom is where the best learning happens.

4. What does learning look like? « What Ed Said - April 5, 2010

[…]  I’ve seen wonderful examples of what learning looks like on teacher and student blogs.  Ian in Sheffield is planning to give cameras to students  for them to photograph what they think learning looks […]

5. What does learning look like? « What Ed Said - April 5, 2010

[…]  I’ve seen wonderful examples of what learning looks like on teacher and student blogs.  Ian in Sheffield is planning to give cameras to students  for them to photograph what they think learning looks […]


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: